Time to Talk! at the Civil Society Summit 2020

Time to Talk! will host a panel discussion during the virtual Civil Society Summit 2020. Four Children Advisory Comittee delegates from Kenya and Bangladesh will share there experience and suggestions in a session called “Let our voices be heard: Working children perspectives on local and global matters”.

Anyone who wants to join the session on Tuesday, 6th October at 1.30 pm (CET) is more than welcomed!

Session Description:

The exploitation of children through any form of work that deprives children of their childhood and right to education is extremely harmful to their physical and mental wellbeing and deprives them of their human rights. According to the International Labour Organization (ILO) there are an estimated 152 million children in child labour, 72 million of which are engaged in hazardous work. “It’s Time to Talk! – Children´s Views on Children´s Work (T2T) is a collaborative research and advocacy project with working children supported by Kindernothilfe (KNH) and Terre des hommes Germany (TdH) in partnership with local and national NGOs and working children’s Advisory Committees. The project was driven by the need to support working children’s right to participation, to better understand the diversity of working children’s experiences, and to ensure that children’s views and best interests inform decision-making processes affecting them.

Participants:

Rabia was born in Bangladesh in 2006. Rabia is visually impaired. She was affected by a virus when she was only nine months and because of family poverty her parents could not provide proper
treatment and she lost total vision in her left eye, and has partial vision in her right eye. Rabia and her mother make paper bags at home and supply those to the local market. Rabia is studying in class six in a mainstream school, and she works after school. Rabiya is active in the global advocacy campaign “Time to Talk!”, supported by the Bangladeshi NGO “Centre for Services and Information on Disability
Bangladesh” (www.csidbd.com). As a member of a local children advisory committee, she is actively involved in advocating for the rights of children with disabilities and working children.
Monir was born in Bangladesh in 2005. He studied until grade 6 and he currently works producing and selling women’s hand bags. Despite a physical disability, Monir is active in the global advocacy campaign “Time to Talk!”, supported by the Bangladeshi NGO “Centre for Services and Information on Disability Bangladesh (www.csidbd. com) . As a member of a local children advisory committee, he is actively involved in advocating for the rights of children with disabilities and working children.
Mary was born in Kenya in 2002. While she waits to be admitted to college, she is currently working in a quarry with her grandmother, and also works in a government initiative called Kazi Mtaani which allows young people to offer casual labour such as cleaning community facilities, drainages, clearing blocked sewers  and sweeping roads. Mary is active in the global advocacy campaign “Time to Talk!”, supported by the Kenyan NGO “Action for Children in Conflict” (www.actionchildren.or.ke). She is an active member of the local children advisory committee which organised a  campaign to raise awareness on child labour and children’s rights.
Margaret was born in Kenya in 2002. After 12 years of primary and secondary education, her work currently consists of selling peanuts and fruits. Margaret currently works in a hotel as a waitress where she is employed by a relative. Margaret is active in the global advocacy campaign “Time to Talk!”, supported by the Kenyan NGO “Action for Children in Conflict” (www.actionchildren.or.ke). She is an active member of the local children advisory committee which organised a campaign to raise awareness on child labour and children’s rights.